THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1911

A complete and modern exposition of thought, learning and achievement, a vivid representation of the world's activities, so arranged and classified as to afford a maximum of accessibility, and embodying everything that can possibly interest or concern a civilized people.

THE NEW EDITION (the 11th) OF THE

Issued by The
Cambridge University Press (England)

The sum of human knowledge - all that mankind has thought, done or achieve, all of the past experience of humanity that has survived the trial of time and the ordeal of service and is preserved as the useful knowledge of today. Of the human race and its endowment, of persons, places, histories, languages, literature, arts, sciences, religions, philosophies, laws, industries, and of the things and ideas connected with these, all is included that is relevant and everything explained that is explainable. In brief, to borrow an illustration from the engineer, the contents of the Eleventh Edition of the EB constitute a cross section of the trunk of the tree of knowledge.

A new and modern work of reference adapted to modern needs - The appearance of a fresh and original edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica has been welcomed by scholars and by book-buyers generally throughout the English-speaking world as a prime need of the day. Those who have never found any work of reference exactly suited to their needs will find that the new edition will bear the closest scrutiny, not only from the point of view of its scholarship, but because of its efficiency as an intelligent recorder of the newer activities of the world of thought, research and experience, activities which are dealt with adequately in no other work. The Eleventh Edition is not a book only for the erudite, but more particularly for the average reader, being a complete inventory of extant knowledge, and an epitome of the world’s progress reduced to an A B C simplicity of arrangement.

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